Nope

I am a collection of impluses.

Most of them unpleasant.
posted: 13 hours ago
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posted: 5 days ago
plays

posted: 5 days ago

What? That’s wrong? Well how about this…

Well if that’s wrong then I don’t want to be right.

posted: 5 days ago
tezukainenglish:

Although he almost never gets credit for it in the English-speaking world, Osamu Tezuka did a lot of very solid graphic design work.  He spent a great deal of time and effort in creating logos that graphically represented and resonated with his work.
We’ll start with three works many English-speaking fans will be familiar with: Phoenix [火の鳥] (1967-88), Dororo [どろろ] (1967-69), and Barbara [ばるぼら] (1973-74). Each of them is a very different series, and this clearly comes through in their logo designs. In his logo design for Phoenix [火の鳥], Tezuka conveys a sense of grandeur and majesty befitting his generation-spanning masterpiece, while Dororo's [どろろ] nearly oozes with the eeriness of a samurai-era ghost story.  On the other hand, Barbara's [ばるぼら] logo, without a single straight edge or angle, clearly demonstrates the organic and “rolling along” nature of the story, without falling into the trap of being overly whimsical.
posted: 1 week ago
tezukainenglish:

Next up, take a look at the logos for Swallowing the Earth [地球を呑む] (1968-69), Buddha [ブッダ] (1972-83), and Ayako [奇子] (1972-73).
Again, three very different stories reflected in their logos. Swallowing the Earth [地球を呑む] portrays the feeling of frantic energy being barely contained, while the austerity and seriousness of Tezuka’s Buddha [ブッダ] almost feels chiseled out of the stone. Finally, the tight, thin but untidy lines of Ayako [奇子] exemplifies the corrupt underbelly of a family trying to save face.
posted: 1 week ago
tezukainenglish:

Finally, let’s consider the logos for Apollo’s Song [アポロの歌] (1970), Ode to Kirihito [きりひと讃歌] (1970-71), and The Book of Human Insects [人間昆虫記] (1970-71).
The sharp straight lines and round balls of Apollo’s Song [アポロの歌] give it a very sci-fi feeling, something you can see being appealing to the story’s Queen Sigma.  While the plain, yet elegant lines of Ode to Kirihito [きりひと讃歌] make it almost feel like it was written on a medical chart. However, I think The Book of Human Insects [人間昆虫記] is actually the most interesting of the bunch.  Although some versions of this logo are slightly more organic or “insect-like”, here Tezuka stacks the characters in an almost harsh manner.  Visually it makes the reader climb, almost like using a ladder, to the top of the pile before it can be read. In a way, it reflects Toshiko Tomura’s insatiable need to reach the top of the social/corporate ladder.
posted: 1 week ago